CONCERTS

MAKE A RESERVATION AT THE CUP CAFE or MAYNARDS KITCHEN AND ASK THE HOSTESS TO
RESERVE YOUR SEATS FOR THE SHOW WHILE YOU DINE!

An Evening with SLAID CLEAVES
Thursday, Oct. 30, Doors at 7:00 PM
Hotel Congress, Copper Hall
311 E. Congress St., Downtown Tucson

Tickets $20 advance, $25 day of show
PURCHASE TICKETS  ONLINE HERE
Outlets- Hotel Congress, Lobby
Antigone Books, 411 N 4th Ave.
Dark Star Leather, 2940 N Swan Rd.

Slaid Cleaves returns to Tucson after sold-out concerts in 2009, 2011 and 2013.

with title

Slaid Cleaves spins stories with a novelist’s eye and a poet’s heart. Twenty years into his career, the celebrated songwriter’s “Still Fighting the War” spotlights an artist in peak form. Cleaves’ seamless collection delivers vivid snapshots as wildly cinematic as they are carefully chiseled. Dress William Faulkner with faded jeans and a worn six-string for a good idea. “Slaid’s a craftsman,” says Terri Hendrix, who sings harmony on “Texas Love Song.” “He goes about his songs like a woodworker.”

Accordingly, Cleaves’ earthy narratives stand oak strong. “Men go off to war for a hundred reasons/But they all come home with the same demons,” he sings on his latest album’s title track. “Some you can keep at bay for a while/Some will pin you to the floor/You’ve been home for a couple of years now, buddy/But you’re still fighting the war.” Few writers frame bruised souls as clearly. Fewer still deliver a punch with such striking immediacy.

“I started ‘Still Fighting the War’ four years ago and originally each verse was a separate character,” Cleaves explains. “Each verse was about getting swindled. One was about the economy, one was about a returning veteran, one was about a broken-up couple. It was too cumbersome, so I focused in on the soldier. The key that made it all work came as I was talking to my friend and occasional co-writer, Ron Coy. A troubled Vietnam vet buddy of his had recently passed away. Ron said, ‘All this time, it was like he was still fighting the war.’ I knew instantly that was the perfect way to summarize the song.”

Cleaves delivers equal measures of hope and resignation throughout his latest release as life lessons slide subtly through side doors. “Normally when I start writing a new batch, a theme starts to emerge after three or four songs,” says Cleaves, who built an unlikely success story from scratch after moving to Austin, Texas, from Maine two decades ago. “This time around I thought, I’m just gonna write where the muse takes me and each song will be its own thing. So I ended up with a CD that has a bit more variety on it compared to my previous releases. Half the songs are about struggle and perseverance and half are all over the place, some tongue-in-cheek stuff, a gospel song, a Texas pride song.”

Called, “one of the finest songwriters from Texas,” by the New York Times, Slaid knows a thing or two about perseverance. For 25 years he’s been working his craft and he just keeps getting better. Cleaves is a winner of the prestigious New Folk Competition at the Kerrville Folk Festival, an award previously given to such artists as Nanci Griffith, Robert Earl Keen and Steve Earle.


 

DUSTBOWL REVIVAL
Sat, Dec. 6, Doors at 7:00 PM
Hotel Congress, Club Congress
311 E. Congress St., Downtown Tucson

Tickets $20 advance, $25 day of show
PURCHASE TICKETS  ONLINE HERE
Outlets- Hotel Congress, Lobby
www.dustbowlrevival.com

4fe953_223bf687554048758aa2f7d67689a88f.jpg_srz_980_616_85_22_0.50_1.20_0 (1)Named “Best Live Band in LA” by The LA Weekly, each Dustbowl performance promises to be a white-knuckle ride through the history of American folk music that rarely stays just on the stage. Call it the new old-timey dance hall sound made fresh by some of the best soloists in the business. After placing songs on ABC and Fox and having tunes featured in independent films like “Made In China” (winner of SXSW) winning Americana song of the year from the Independent Music Awards (Tom Waits judging), playing festivals like Outside Lands and Live Oak and opening for bands like Rebirth Brass Band and Trombone Shorty,
the band began barnstorming more extensively across the USA.

Founder Z. Lupetin came west from Chicago and placed a humble Craigslist ad to get the circus started. The group has grown steadily from a small string band playing up and down the west coast, into a traveling mini orchestra featuring instrumentation that often includes fiddle, mandolin, trombone, clarinet, trumpet, ukelele, drums, tuba, organ, a bass made from a canoe oar, harmonica and plenty of washboard and kazoo for good luck.

With their latest record Carry Me Home rising on the Americana charts, the band is slated for a big 2014. A European tour is in the works. They will be recording their first live album at San Francisco’s Great American Music Hall and LA’s famed Troubadour and have toured the Midwest and East coast.

 

Comments are closed.

SEO Powered by Platinum SEO from Techblissonline